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Tomlinson Jr. Emily Goldman New York: Routledge, Keith Neilson London: Frank Cass, Nicholas Rodger London: Macmillan, Awards and Prizes Norman B. Professor Nicholas A. Lambert was appointed as the tenth chair-holder in August The following is a report of his activities during the academic year. With respect to the last, the class looked in detail at the development of US Marine Corps doctrine and the assault on Tarawa, and also US naval logistics in the Pacific. Teaching such a large and important subject in the space of a single term is a challenge—especially to plebes, who of all the midshipmen have the least time to read or to think.

Additionally, most arrive at the Naval Academy with a weak grasp of US and World history, geography, and current events.

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Too many possess weak writing skills; some are slow to accept their deficiencies or the necessity to invest a portion of their time to improve their writing. None of these shortcomings are insoluble, and with close instruction during the course of the term most midshipmen show considerable improvement—but this remedial instruction in writing can only come at the cost of reducing the time available to teach naval history. The far greater difficulty is persuading midshipmen that instruction in the study of history is a worthwhile topic.

There seems little doubt that within the Brigade at large, naval history is viewed as a subject of secondary importance.

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The key is to awaken sometimes literally the innate enthusiasm for the subject possessed by most, while at the same time demonstrating the relevance of what they are being taught for a career in the US Navy. This often means teaching at a higher level than some might consider appropriate, because the principal utility of studying history for an officer is that it trains the brain to handle complexity.

But the best of the midshipmen are willing to rise to the challenge, and in so doing draw along in the wake many of the remainder. To help the plebes develop an appreciation of their naval heritage as well as to impress upon them the importance for naval officers to enhance their understanding of history, Professor Lambert invited two distinguished US Navy officers to give the final lectures of the terms.

The Admiral enthralled the midshipman with his memories of Captain Philipps, who of course was awarded the Navy Cross for his famous torpedo attack at Surigao Straits on 25 October Again, the midshipmen were spellbound. Thanks to the generosity of Claude Berube, the director of the naval academy museum, both classes were held in the museum conference room seated at the table presented by the king of Japan in to Commodore Mathew C. This course examined the manner in which changes in the economic, social, and political structures of the European powers, influenced the development of western military institutions including the United States.

This interrelationship between military and naval institutions on the one hand, and alterations in economic, social, political, and international relations structures on the other, in turn provided the basis for the study of strategy, operations, tactics, logistics, and weapons technology.

The opening question posed the midshipmen was why do politicians sometimes act contrary to the expert opinion of their professional military advisors? This course explored this question through an in-depth look at the infamous British attack at Gallipoli during the First World War, one of the greatest military disasters of the 20th century. The class learned that the reasons for the campaign had little to do with operational concerns and a great deal to do with domestic politics and economic concerns.

The organizers estimated attendance at over three hundred. The museum director reported that the presentation attracted a record audience and was well received. Scholarship Like several of his predecessors in the chair, Professor Lambert did not have as much time as he had expected to work on his scholarship.

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Teaching midshipmen remained the first priority. He fell just short of the line, completing revision to the twelve chapters comprising the main body of the book. During the summer vacation, Professor Lambert hopes to finish the introduction and conclusions and submit the finished manuscript to the publishers. In addition, Professor Lambert did manage to have published an essay based upon a lecture given at a conference sponsored by the Carnegie Institute.

Lambert 8 June Teaching In each term, Professor Lambert taught the mandatory American naval history course HH to a section of plebes from the incoming class of The Midshipmen were expected not merely to accumulate knowledge, but to understand the dynamics of these pivotal subjects. Teaching such a large and important subject as US naval history in the space of a single term is a challenge—especially to plebes, who of all the midshipmen have the least time to read or to think.


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Additionally, as I mentioned in my last report, and previous chair holders have also remarked, most plebes arrive at the Naval Academy with a shockingly weak grasp of history world and US , geography, current events, and writing skills. The answers I get to this simple and straightforward question are sometimes amazing. It also is difficult persuading some midshipmen that instruction in the study of history is a worthwhile topic. In my presentation at the 60th Reunion, I suggested to the Class that the first objective is to demonstrate to the Midshipmen the relevance of history for a career in the US Navy.

Once the relevance is established, they are inclined to invest more effort in grappling with a complex subject, making it possible to teach at a far higher level. The best of the midshipmen willingly rise to the challenge, pulling along the rest in their wake.

After a few weeks, the majority are surprised to learn that the US Navy has played a far more important role in the development of this country than they had thought, or they had been taught in school, or had appeared in any book they had ever read. After two years as the Class of Chair, Professor Lambert has formed the conclusion that the best that be accomplished in the allotted time is to instill in the midshipman an appreciation of naval history; to educate them as why an understanding of history is important to a naval officer; to encourage them to continue reading history after they leave the Naval Academy; and above all to provide them with the necessary skills to self-educate.

To help the plebes develop an appreciation of their naval heritage, Professor Lambert invited two members of the Class of to give the final lectures of the terms: Admiral Bruce DeMars in the fall and Captain Bill Peerenboom in the spring. Both instructed the midshipmen on the importance of reading widely, especially history.

Again, the director of the naval academy museum allowed him to teach his classes in the museum conference room seated at the table presented by the Emperor of Japan in to Commodore Mathew C. We also looked at various subsequent competing theories of Sea Power, testing the validity and applicability of each in light of the enormous changes in the world during the late-nineteenth and early twentieth century.

Finally, we looked at the development of the US Navy during the period and , again testing Sea Power theory against the actual events. The course explored this question through an in-depth look at the infamous British attack at Gallipoli during the First World War, one of the greatest military disasters of the 20th century. The class learned that the reasons for the campaign had little to do with operational concerns and a great deal to do with domestic politics and economic issues.

During the course of the term, the class was visited by a number of naval officers, active and retired, with experience in the naval or the joint staffs, all of whom contributed their thoughts on various difficulties they observed in the formulation of strategic-policy.

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Nicholas A. XA: Captain A. Scott Mobley, Jr. Naval Identity, Hall, William R.

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Examination Fields: U. Military History, U. Diplomatic History, U. History to Committee: Jeremi Suri, John W. Hayes Pre-doctoral Fellowship in U. Navy Professionalization, Armstrong ed. Naval Profession, Naval Intelligence and Strategic Practice, Advisor: Jeremi Suri. Navy, Advisor: James J. Naval Academy, Advisor: Craig L. Designed curricula for online education methods and technology. Integrated and focused the resources of diverse university departments to achieve program goals.

shadifactory.com/components/worlds/language-and-the-pursuit-of-happiness.php Developed and supervised programs, courses and curricula to enhance learning opportunities at UW-Madison that emphasized leadership and complex, global problem-solving. Integrated and focused the resources of students, university departments, and leading Wisconsin businesses to achieve program objectives. Developed, organized, and led online strategic studies program each summer. Academic advisor for graduate and professional students.

Navy Retired. Thirty years of experience as a Surface Warfare Officer. Truman CVN Military Group Argentina, Buenos Aires. Scott Mobley Jr.